Turning Darkness Into Light, by Marie Brennan

Buy from Amazon.com, BookShop, or Barnes & Noble

Author’s website | Publisher’s website
Publication date – August 20, 2019

Summary: As the renowned granddaughter of Isabella Camherst (Lady Trent, of the riveting and daring Draconic adventure memoirs) Audrey Camherst has always known she, too, would want to make her scholarly mark upon a chosen field of study.

When Lord Gleinheigh recruits Audrey to decipher a series of ancient tablets holding the secrets of the ancient Draconean civilization, she has no idea that her research will plunge her into an intricate conspiracy, one meant to incite rebellion and invoke war. Alongside dearest childhood friend and fellow archeologist Kudshayn, Audrey must find proof of the conspiracy before it’s too late.

Thoughts: I put off reading this book for far too long, since I hadn’t had a chance to read Within the Sanctuary of Wings, the book that preceded this one in the series and also capped off the adventures of Lady Trent. I very much loved the first 4 books in the series, with their approach of taking natural science to a fantasy world, and chronicling the journeys of the scientist who defied society in pursuit of her passions. I didn’t know if I wanted to pick up book 6 without having read book 5 first, for reasons that probably seem pretty obvious.

Fortunately, it’s absolutely possible to do so. Turning Darkness Into Light switches perspective from Lady Trent to her granddaughter, Audrey, and her own academic adventures.While I wouldn’t go so far as to suggest that readers can pick up this book without having read any of the previous novels in the series, it is possible to have not read all of the preceding books and to still enjoy this one.

Though go figure, it seems like enough of the world’s understanding of dragons changed after an event in Within the Sanctuary of Wings, and I had to pick up on those from context clues in Turning Darkness Into Light. It wasn’t difficult to put the pieces together, though, and soon enough I was happily turning pages, eager for more of the story to unfold.

Audrey is hired by Lord Gleinleigh to translate the text of what appears to be a large cache of clay tablets from the Draconean culture, and along with a Draconean scholar named Kudshayn and Lord Gleinleigh’s neice Cora, the tablets are revealed to be an epic story telling the beginnings of the Draconean people. Only it’s not quite the story that Kudshayn is familiar with, and to make matters worse, the story turns rather violent over time, echoing fears from a group of people who claim that Draconeans are nothing but mindless beasts who want to burn humanity to the ground. There’s definitely something going on that strikes at the heart of multiple cultures, but the exact nature of that strike remains shadowed and uncertain as the trio work to translate the texts that may well up-end so much that many people hold dear.

I kind of love that in a way, Turning Darkness Into Light is a history of history. It’s styled as a collection of diary entries and articles and notes from people involved in undertaking a massive project with huge cultural implications, detailing their journey and all of the steps they took, their thoughts and feelings, all of the things you’d find in a novel, only with the presentation of a piece of nonfiction. Given that the trio were working on a translation of the tablets with an eye to publication, Turning Darkness Into Light is presented as that very book they eventually published. It’s a similar style to the original Memoirs of Lady Trent novels, fiction presented as nonfiction within a fictional world, and I could gorge myself silly on books with this style and never get tired of it. The anthropologist in me wants more SFF novels done in this style.

All of the characters in this book were compelling, even the ones that were clearly people I wouldn’t want anything to do with in real life. Lord Gleinleigh and Aaron Mornett’s motivations may have been unclear through much of the novel, but it was nevertheless interesting when they made an appearance, adding little bits of information here and there that added to their characters and their roles within the story. Audrey’s hot-headedness and desire to live up to her family’s reputation was something I could very much empathize with; you could feel her passion for her work and her urge to prove herself with every page. Kudshayn was a glimpse into a culture that I’m not familiar with and yet want to become more familiar with. And Cora… Well, Cora was the one I could relate to the most. The one that didn’t fit in, the one that had trouble understanding motivations and social cues and would much rather have been doing her own thing without interruption. She’s definitely a character on the neurodiverse spectrum

Brennan does such a good job at setting the stage for mysteries steeped in archaeology and natural science, taking the fantastical into the realm of underappreciated scientific procedure, the combination of boredom and excitement that permeates investigation and the hope of discovery. This is the sort of book, the sort of series, that you turn to when you love both fantasy and ethnographies, when you want an uncommon approach to the exploration of the reality behind the fantasy. I’m very much a fan of Brennan’s writing, and her highly-detailed world-building, and I highly recommend Turning Darkness Into Light for those who enjoyed the Lady Trent novels or those who are anthropologists and archaeologists at heart. This series has the wings to soar above the rest.

(Book received in exchange for an honest review.)

2 comments on “Turning Darkness Into Light, by Marie Brennan

  1. Pingback: April 2020 in Retrospect | Bibliotropic

  2. Pingback: Within the Sanctuary of Wings, by Marie Brennan | Bibliotropic

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s